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Wu JL, Chiang MF, Hsu PH, Tsai DY, Hung KH, Wang YH, Angata T, Lin KI. O-GlcNAcylation is required for B cell homeostasis and antibody responses. Nature communications 2017 8(1) 29187734
Abstract:
O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase (Ogt) catalyzes O-GlcNAc modification. O-GlcNAcylation is increased after cross-linking of the B-cell receptor (BCR), but the physiological function of this reaction is unknown. Here we show that lack of Ogt in B-cell development not only causes severe defects in the activation of BCR signaling, but also perturbs B-cell homeostasis by enhancing apoptosis of mature B cells, partly as a result of impaired response to B-cell activating factor. O-GlcNAcylation of Lyn at serine 19 is crucial for efficient Lyn activation and Syk interaction in BCR-mediated B-cell activation and expansion. Ogt deficiency in germinal center (GC) B cells also results in enhanced apoptosis of GC B cells and memory B cells in an immune response, consequently causing a reduction of antibody levels. Together, these results demonstrate that B cells rely on O-GlcNAcylation to maintain homeostasis, transduce BCR-mediated activation signals and activate humoral immunity.
O-GlcNAc proteins:
FAIM3, K1109, BCORL, M3K15, KANL3, EXC6B, PLHD1, CTTB2, MYO1E, SCLT1, TAF4B, TCOF, FLOT1, OXLA, HDAC1, SYPL1, SEM4D, MA2B1, PPE2, PLD3, DPOD2, NOCT, HNRH1, API5, DFFA, DHX9, MMP8, DPM1, EIF3D, ESS2, CTNL1, VTI1B, S28A2, FA5, CO4B, IGKC, LAC1, IGHA, IGHDM, HA11, LAMC1, TBA1B, LDHA, HVM51, SPTA1, ZFP1, EGR1, ENPL, RPB1, ITB1, ENV1, 4F2, HS90B, HA2B, HB2A, CD44, BLK, CN37, LAMP2, ZFP37, PTBP1, HB2I, BASI, FAS, EVI2A, MDR1A, BGAL, ITAL, LYN, TLN1, MOES, U2AF2, MAP4, GNA13, RL3, CATG, DPP4, PTN6, HEXA, NKTR, HMGB2, SUH, CEAM1, GTR3, DRG1, RAB5C, CD22, FMR1, VGFR1, GRP75, CAP1, ECI1, FOXK1, STAT1, NKX25, TCPQ, H11, H13, IL12B, CAPZB, RL5, VDR, RET3, ADCY7, VA0D1, AAAT, IMA1, STOM, FUS, NICA, RU2A, EF2, AAAS, RUVB1, ABCE1, DCAF7, HNRPK, 1433G, ACTA, RS6, VATB2, RL23, RL8, PP2BA, RACK1, TBB4B, M4K1, ITPR3, SURF6, ELAV1, EVL, H2B1A, AT8A1, TCPH, TCPB, NXN, TBB5, HNRL2, CREB1, PLAK, 3MG, CO6A1, LG3BP, COE1, CNN2, NSUN2, HMHA1, SNUT2, SMCA4, TPC10, TGRM2, I20L2, LMF1, PUF60, ZSWM8, PRRC1, SC31A, CPZIP, ITAD, ULK4, ITA1, DYHC2, LIN54, JKIP3, GRHL3, MYO1G, SIN3A, IRAG2, SAMH1, KHDR1, LY75, RASA3, NPT2A, CAPR1, ARHG2, PML, IMA5, LAP2B, PRP4B, M4K2, TS101, ARHG1, PLSL, CTNA2, VSX2, CD37, SERA, PCBP2, TIF1B, COCH, NUP62, RALY, UT14A, ARG39, CLH1, ATS16, F120A, NOP58, TEDC2, U520, RRP12, SMHD1, ANO6, TTBK1, CHD4, SARM1, NUP98, RASL2, TNKS1, AT1A2, NFRKB, DDX55, DNA2, H2B1C, CMYA5, GIMA8, CYFP1, SPAG5, HNRPQ, RPF1, MBB1A, PRC2A, ADCY2, MOGS, SDA1, FA98B, WIPI2, TRRAP, XYLT1, WDR82, GNS, ERLN2, S38A9, WASF2, CMC1, NIM1, TBL1R, ZN526, CARF, HES7, UNC80, RBGPR, ECHA, ELMO1, F214B, KMT2C, FLNA, TPC2, RBBP5, POGZ, DOC10, SYFA, SMKZ, COR2A, RBM14, DOCK2, CASP9, RAE1L, NUP88, RPB2, UACA, SYEP, P66A, VPS50, COPA, VWF, TXTP, ZN536, LMBD1, R4RL1, C2D1A, URP2, STX5, GT251, SDHA, PO121, ABLM1, COL12, ALAT1, RORB, PDLI2, ERO1B, CD177, PSPC1, NUP58, STAB2, LRC8C, COX18, MAVS, PLBL1, UN93B, EVI2B, MYH9, ESIP1, VIGLN, PSMD2, HNRL1, CCAR2, SP7, RECQ5, SFXN3, IF4A3, RINI, DDX1, UBAP2, S15A4, DNJC9, MASP2, UXS1, CSCL1, BMP2K, CYRIB, SYDC, C1TC, GLYR1, PDIA6, CIC, S12A6, ATAD3, MYO5A, MCLN1, ABEC3, STML2, SFXN1, PRP19, TARA, MCRS1, RTCB, NDUS5, S12A9, SF3B1, ANR17, NU155, TR34A, BAP1, PRP8, NUDC2, TSN31, RN138, RTRAF, RU2B, YETS4, M2OM, MIC19, SNX2, DDX28, CXXC1, RUSD4, ILF2, CHTOP, LUC7L, DIM1, MCES, SEC13, SP2, NOP56, U2AF1, EF1G, MCEM1, EVPL, PRP4, CMTR1, WWP2, DHB11, PESC, TLR9, IRX6, KRT81, RBP2, AFF4, KAT2B, STK3, NUP50, DDX21, ACINU, SIGIR, ZN207, SLAF1, SON, H2AY, MTA2, SAE1, MYO1C, RUVB2, TRPV2, PFKAP, ARC1B, ASAH1, VAPA, EHD1, IF2G, CLIC1, HNRPC, HNRPF
Species: Mus musculus
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Morris M, Knudsen GM, Maeda S, Trinidad JC, Ioanoviciu A, Burlingame AL, Mucke L. Tau post-translational modifications in wild-type and human amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice. Nature neuroscience 2015 18(8) 26192747
Abstract:
The microtubule-associated protein tau has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. Reducing tau levels ameliorates AD-related synaptic, network, and behavioral abnormalities in transgenic mice expressing human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP). We used mass spectrometry to characterize the post-translational modification of endogenous tau isolated from wild-type and hAPP mice. We identified seven types of tau modifications at 63 sites in wild-type mice. Wild-type and hAPP mice had similar modifications, supporting the hypothesis that neuronal dysfunction in hAPP mice is enabled by physiological forms of tau. Our findings provide clear evidence for acetylation and ubiquitination of the same lysine residues; some sites were also targeted by lysine methylation. Our findings refute the hypothesis of extensive O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification of endogenous tau. The complex post-translational modification of physiological tau suggests that tau is regulated by diverse mechanisms.
Species: Mus musculus
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Myers SA, Panning B, Burlingame AL. Polycomb repressive complex 2 is necessary for the normal site-specific O-GlcNAc distribution in mouse embryonic stem cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2011 108(23) 21606357
Abstract:
The monosaccharide addition of an N-acetylglucosamine to serine and threonine residues of nuclear and cytosolic proteins (O-GlcNAc) is a posttranslational modification emerging as a general regulator of many cellular processes, including signal transduction, cell division, and transcription. The sole mouse O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) is essential for embryonic development. To understand the role of OGT in mouse development better, we mapped sites of O-GlcNAcylation of nuclear proteins in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Here, we unambiguously identify over 60 nuclear proteins as O-GlcNAcylated, several of which are crucial for mouse ESC cell maintenance. Furthermore, we extend the connection between OGT and Polycomb group genes from flies to mammals, showing Polycomb repressive complex 2 is necessary to maintain normal levels of OGT and for the correct cellular distribution of O-GlcNAc. Together, these results provide insight into how OGT may regulate transcription in early development, possibly by modifying proteins important to maintain the ESC transcriptional repertoire.
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