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Massman LJ, Pereckas M, Zwagerman NT, Olivier-Van Stichelen S. O-GlcNAcylation Is Essential for Rapid Pomc Expression and Cell Proliferation in Corticotropic Tumor Cells. Endocrinology 2021 162(12) 34418053
Abstract:
Pituitary adenomas have a staggering 16.7% lifetime prevalence and can be devastating in many patients because of profound endocrine and neurologic dysfunction. To date, no clear genomic or epigenomic markers correlate with their onset or severity. Herein, we investigate the impact of the O-GlcNAc posttranslational modification in their etiology. Found in more than 7000 human proteins to date, O-GlcNAcylation dynamically regulates proteins in critical signaling pathways, and its deregulation is involved in cancer progression and endocrine diseases such as diabetes. In this study, we demonstrated that O-GlcNAc enzymes were upregulated, particularly in aggressive adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-secreting tumors, suggesting a role for O-GlcNAcylation in pituitary adenoma etiology. In addition to the demonstration that O-GlcNAcylation was essential for their proliferation, we showed that the endocrine function of pituitary adenoma is also dependent on O-GlcNAcylation. In corticotropic tumors, hypersecretion of the proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived hormone ACTH leads to Cushing disease, materialized by severe endocrine disruption and increased mortality. We demonstrated that Pomc messenger RNA is stabilized in an O-GlcNAc-dependent manner in response to corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH). By affecting Pomc mRNA splicing and stability, O-GlcNAcylation contributes to this new mechanism of fast hormonal response in corticotropes. Thus, this study stresses the essential role of O-GlcNAcylation in ACTH-secreting adenomas' pathophysiology, including cellular proliferation and hypersecretion.
O-GlcNAc proteins:
GPTC8, ITB4, PTPRF, VIR, HMCN2, SETX, RTF1, MYH7B, FSIP2, TITIN, ARGAL, CO6A5, MMRN2, STOX1, PLXB2, AGRG4, F25A2, LOXH1, HMCN1, TM233, PIEZ1, TOPZ1, CE350, M3K19, RYR2, ACACB, RN213, CF251, ARHG5, BICRA, FOXM1, DLDH, PEX5, WRN, CELR1, PROM1, STK10, MYPC3, DTNB, IKKB, ACTN3, ALDOC, RPB1, LMNB1, MAP1B, HVM57, PAI1, MCM3, MIS, RGRF1, MSRE, CTND1, RB22A, ZO1, QOR, ANXA5, MSH6, EVC, KCNN2, DEPD5, NOE3, TBB4B, ROCK1, GSH1, G3BP1, ATS1, TBB5, NF1, PGBM, IF2P, FA8, GDF3, KCMA1, ZCH18, TANC1, NSUN7, SHRM4, FAT4, IGFN1, HMHA1, FA98A, SCRN3, CH048, K22E, SHLD2, BIG3, SDK1, BAHC1, SLMAP, TBCD9, RIMB3, DYH12, ITAD, CKAP2, IGS10, A3LT2, ITA1, HERC2, XIRP2, TR150, IQEC2, LRC8B, FAT2, S39AC, VP13A, MTUS1, GSTCD, TENS3, ACACA, UTP20, KLRA4, PAPOA, STAR3, EWS, KTN1, GRID1, DDX5, CP131, SEM3B, TLL1, MINT, CCPG1, BTF3, TPP2, RBL1, COBA2, TASOR, PDS5A, CE290, NAL14, A2MG, ZZZ3, FREM2, CPSF6, RPRD2, HEAT6, P4R3A, FIL1L, SNX6, GAPD1, PTN23, TRI37, MON1A, MSL1, SARM1, CENPE, DAPLE, TIAM2, UBE2O, KDM3B, SYNE1, CMYA5, FHOD3, TBB2A, MYCB2, SGO2, MCAF1, STAR9, CAPS1, PHF8, CUL9, CLAP1, ST18, SGSM2, TAF1, M18BP, UBP2L, FLNB, OFD1, PTHB1, PDK1, TMCO3, NRDC, MARF1, TM87B, UNC80, TCAF1, KTU, UBP43, CAPS2, ZN609, DOCK2, RHG24, NAKD2, LENG8, UFL1, CD158, CLASR, SSPO, SLTM, NAV1, FBX4, RFWD3, MICA3, STAU2, NEIL3, CCD14, DDX18, UBP45, AL1L1, CCD80, TF2H3, FYCO1, HNRPU, DYH5, DHX36, AGRV1, FLNC, REST, NDUS1, CREL1, CELR3, DYST, BRWD1, GOGA2, PDIA6, TM1L1, RT4I1, CSTN3, PRP19, TARA, UBP16, NOG2, MYO7B, BCDO2, RTN4, RRBP1, ZN318, DHX30, MITOS, RBM33, NARF, KLH35, ACSL3, SYRC, C16L2, NBEA, TBB3, XPO4, RBCC1, LRP1B, CAC1F, PRG4, BIR1B, SRCN1, SHRM3, ING1, MACF1, ACL7A, SMK2B, H17B6, RPGR, RHG07, MAST1, ADA11, TIM, PFKAP, IRAG1, DEMA, P2R3D, SETBP, NEK4, PLD1
Species: Mus musculus
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Deracinois B, Camoin L, Lambert M, Boyer JB, Dupont E, Bastide B, Cieniewski-Bernard C. O-GlcNAcylation site mapping by (azide-alkyne) click chemistry and mass spectrometry following intensive fractionation of skeletal muscle cells proteins. Journal of proteomics 2018 186 30016717
Abstract:
The O-linked-N-acetyl-d-glucosaminylation (O-GlcNAcylation) modulates numerous aspects of cellular processes. Akin to phosphorylation, O-GlcNAcylation is highly dynamic, reversible, and responds rapidly to extracellular demand. Despite the absolute necessity to determine post-translational sites to fully understand the role of O-GlcNAcylation, it remains a high challenge for the major reason that unmodified proteins are in excess comparing to the O-GlcNAcylated ones. Based on a click chemistry approach, O-GlcNAcylated proteins were labelled with azido-GalNAc and coupled to agarose beads. The proteome extracted from C2C12 myotubes was submitted to an intensive fractionation prior to azide-alkyne click chemistry. This combination of fractionation and click chemistry is a powerful methodology to map O-GlcNAc sites; indeed, 342 proteins were identified through the identification of 620 peptides containing one or more O-GlcNAc sites. We localized O-GlcNAc sites on proteins involved in signalling pathways or in protein modification, as well as structural proteins. Considering the recent role of O-GlcNAcylation in the modulation of sarcomere morphometry and interaction between key structural protein, we focused on proteins involved in the cytoarchitecture of skeletal muscle cells. In particular, several O-GlcNAc sites were located into protein-protein interaction domains, suggesting that O-GlcNAcylation could be strongly involved in the organization and reorganization of sarcomere and myofibrils.
Species: Mus musculus
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