REFERENCES



Choose an author or browse all
Choose the species or browse all
Choose a criteria for sorting
 Reverse sorting
Search for a protein
Search for a single PMID
Select O-GlcNAc references filter

Click to expand (6 results)


Qin K, Zhu Y, Qin W, Gao J, Shao X, Wang YL, Zhou W, Wang C, Chen X. Quantitative Profiling of Protein O-GlcNAcylation Sites by an Isotope-Tagged Cleavable Linker. ACS chemical biology 2018 13(8) 30059200
Abstract:
Large-scale quantification of protein O-linked β- N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification in a site-specific manner remains a key challenge in studying O-GlcNAc biology. Herein, we developed an isotope-tagged cleavable linker (isoTCL) strategy, which enabled isotopic labeling of O-GlcNAc through bioorthogonal conjugation of affinity tags. We demonstrated the application of the isoTCL in mapping and quantification of O-GlcNAcylation sites in HeLa cells. Furthermore, we investigated the O-GlcNAcylation sensitivity to the sugar donor by quantifying the levels of modification under different concentrations of the O-GlcNAc labeling probe in a site-specific manner. In addition, we applied isoTCL to compare the O-GlcNAcylation stoichiometry levels of more than 100 modification sites between placenta samples from male and female mice and confirmed site-specifically that female placenta has a higher O-GlcNAcylation than its male counterpart. The isoTCL platform provides a powerful tool for quantitative profiling of O-GlcNAc modification.
O-GlcNAc proteins:
A0A0A6YVU8, A0A1B0GSG7, RBM47, ZN335, A2A8N0, TITIN, SBNO1, CNOT1, PHRF1, ZN462, TAGAP, D3YUK0, E9PUR0, E9PVW1, E9PWI7, PARP4, E9PZS2, E9Q2C0, E9Q3G8, E9Q616, BD1L1, E9Q732, ARHG5, E9Q7N9, E9Q842, E9Q9B4, E9Q9Q2, E9QA22, E9QAE1, F6Y6L6, F8VQ29, F8VQM5, J9JI28, PDLI1, SPT5H, TAF4, ARI1A, ABLM1, KMT2D, MYPT1, ZN609, SET1A, SYNEM, PUR4, TNC18, KDM6A, DPOD2, M3K7, TPD54, SYNJ1, ZN207, SRPK2, ACK1, SYUA, MYPT2, KIF1B, HBP1, OGA, VINEX, PLIN3, MAFK, BRD4, PDLI1, KDM6A, SRPK1, N4BP1, ANR17, NCOR1, CREG1, CRTAP, MYO1A, MTR1L, CREG1, TOX4, SUN1, M3K6, PSMG1, SC24B, CNOT4, ABL1, ABL1, EGFR, LAMC1, LMNA, GLCM, GCR, HSPB1, PPBT, RLA2, ITB1, K1C18, K2C8, SAP, CATL1, LAMB1, ENPL, BGLR, NFIC, VIME, SNRPA, ROA1, ATX1L, TGAP1, GLI2, HLAC, CATB, TAU, BIP, FINC, K2C8, TPR, MSH3, ENPL, PO2F1, ATF2, GNS, ZEP1, RS2, MUC1, JUNB, ATF7, CATD, SON, SERPH, NELFE, BIP, ROA2, CBL, IF4B, APC, ARNT, MAP4, TEAD1, RXRA, RXRB, RXRG, CLIP1, AIMP1, HXA11, ELF1, NU214, MP2K2, VATA, CUX1, PBX2, MLH1, STAT3, SSRB, KI67, STT3A, RFX5, LMNA, DPOD2, PAXI, CDK8, YLPM1, NU153, RBP2, TAF6, EMD, PPT1, FXR1, ICAL, HCFC1, AGFG1, NUP98, ATX1, ATN1, PTN5, AF17, DSRAD, AMRP, ACYP2, NU107, ACOT8, S26A1, TB182, YTHD1, ASXL1, PI5PA, RIN3, MRTFB, RL37, KCNA2, RALA, STIM1, PITX1, IF4G2, SRPK2, RENBP, COG7, WNK1, SERF2, RPTN, SPSY, DAB2, RBM10, HNRPU, SPTB2, FOXK2, EWS, MEF2A, SP2, CO7A1, S30BP, NUCB1, ENL, IF4G1, K1C17, TLE3, TLE4, TOP1, SUH, CBG, ACK1, DEMA, AHNK, FOXO1, TROAP, BPTF, NFIA, ROA0, G3BP1, PABP4, ATM, PICAL, MAMD1, RIPK1, STIM1, MTMR1, CUL4B, ASPP2, KLF5, NFYC, CDK13, VEZF1, DSG2, TRI29, UBP2L, SRC8, PUM1, EPN4, RRP1B, NCOA6, DIP2A, MEF2D, NUMA1, R3HD1, KIF14, EBP, RCN1, KS6A1, RBMS2, TAF1C, NCOA2, SF01, JHD2C, MARE1, ELF2, TAB1, ZFHX3, ZYX, ADRM1, CCDC6, TAF9, STX1A, RFX7, QSER1, QRIC1, PRC2C, PBIP1, GSE1, TNR6A, CEAM5, Q3UKP4, COBL1, ARH40, SC31A, PEG3, SRBS2, Q3UU43, Q3UUE0, F91A1, ARBK2, Q497W2, Q4KL65, PHAR4, EPC2, CRTC2, BCORL, K2026, TGO1, PRC2B, TOIP1, SPG17, SHRM1, ZN362, LRIF1, RHG21, UBAP2, RBM26, RPRD2, ZN318, NCOR1, LAMA5, HCFC1, P3C2A, SAP, AP180, MAFK, SPTB2, SH3G1, ZYX, TSH3, INADL, WAPL, KAZRN, SBNO1, ARID2, DYH17, SAM9L, CDK13, LAR4B, BICRL, RHG21, HELZ, TTLL5, PANX2, PKHG2, NIPBL, LIN54, F135A, RPRD2, IF4G1, SPIC, SCYL2, NFRKB, INT1, ZN182, UGGG1, MDEAS, ZC3HE, RICTR, FIP1, CRTC3, SAS6, MCAF1, BCOR, GGYF2, NU188, CO039, UBN2, HAKAI, ASXL2, SPT6H, DDX46, KDM3B, PICAL, PRC2B, OOG2, ZIC5, NRK, POGZ, MAVS, CLAP1, EMSY, I2BP2, SRGP1, SH3R1, HUWE1, YTHD3, NU214, UBP2L, TMC5B, ZN598, TOPRS, SHAN2, Q80ZX0, ZNF18, Q810G1, BCL9L, LUZP1, PRSR1, DDX42, PALB2, P66A, GNS, LPP, TB10B, TGO1, Q8BIB6, ZN771, ZNT6, AAPK2, CNOT4, SP110, IFFO1, YTHD3, NCBP3, DEFI6, RBM14, CNOT2, CABS1, Q8C6L9, TCAL5, TAB1, SCYL2, ASPP2, PHC3, EPN2, PDLI5, I2BP1, RN135, AHNK2, NAV2, MISP, MGAP, ANKH1, PHAR4, XRN1, PELP1, Q8JZK6, Q8K0U8, AGFG1, TXD11, IL23R, ARHG6, SPART, SPICE, NUP93, CLASR, ZN786, SYNPO, FNBP4, ARFG1, ENAH, TNR6A, PHC3, SP20H, NAV1, VP37A, KMT2C, BD1L1, NUP35, STXB6, KNL1, TCAL3, MTSS1, SPART, NUP35, PUM2, STT3B, ALMS1, GEMI5, WIPF2, MAVS, UTP6, PI3R4, AMOT, P66B, STAG1, PCNP, LMO7, ATX2L, CSKI2, P66B, BBX, TITIN, HNMT, UBAP2, DCP1A, NRIF1, SMG7, RTF1, MAML1, ZN592, LAR4B, TAF4B, SHIP1, DDX17, RENT1, GPKOW, FUBP2, LPP, TTC28, PF21A, INT12, RCN3, CERS2, PDLI5, FUBP3, MY15B, ANCHR, CLP1L, Z512B, ZFR, EP400, NOL4L, RBM14, CIC, MED15, PIGS, DCR1C, SIN3A, MINT, EYA3, TEAD3, ATX2, RFC4, DHX58, ANX13, GORS2, TAB2, EPN4, ANR17, DPH2, WAC, DIDO1, YTHD1, AMRA1, TANC1, TXD12, F133B, RBM33, GPI8, Q9D2U0, ZC21B, FUND2, F162A, APMAP, Q9D809, FIP1, CNPY3, Q9DAV5, Q9DB24, ALG2, PLIN3, MYPT1, WWTR1, Q9EQC8, SALL1, RBP2, GILT, MFF, SP130, APC1, I2BPL, RBNS5, EPC1, ADNP, ZN106, TM245, CPVL, PTN23, WNK1, E41L1, ZHX3, ZN335, PKHG2, CCSE2, CQ10B, MLXIP, PKHA5, RC3H2, TAF9B, ZBT20, NCOA5, ZN532, APMAP, HYOU1, ADRM1, GIT2, BAG3, UBN1, PDLI7, DIAP3, RBM12, CARF, ETAA1, HXC10, TAB2, UGGG1, CDK12, ITSN2, CNOT2, TMEM9, DAPLE, NYAP2, KANL3, SON, LIMD1, KI21B, KI21A, PPIE, PCM1, GALK1, MRP5, SE1L1, LIMD1, TCF20, SUN2, AFF4, UBQL2, S30BP, NRBP, SIX4, TASOR, GMEB2, PARP4, NUP50, ZHX1, YETS2, HECD1, SCAF8, SRRM2, SCML2, S22AL, NCOR2, DEMA, POLH, R3HD2, ZN281, FBX7, RPGF2, IRS2, HYOU1, PRC2C, NCOR2, GMEB1, S23IP, SRPK3, Q9Z0I7, VNN1, KLK4, SE1L1, RGS6, E41L1
Download
Gatta E, Lefebvre T, Gaetani S, dos Santos M, Marrocco J, Mir AM, Cassano T, Maccari S, Nicoletti F, Mairesse J. Evidence for an imbalance between tau O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation in the hippocampus of a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. Pharmacological research 2016 105 26816085
Abstract:
Intracellular accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau protein is linked to neuronal degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Mounting evidence suggests that tau phosphorylation and O-N-acetylglucosamine glycosylation (O-GlcNAcylation) are mutually exclusive post-translational modifications. O-GlcNAcylation depends on 3-5% of intracellular glucose that enters the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway. To our knowledge, the existence of an imbalance between tau phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation has not been reported in animal models of AD, as yet. Here, we used triple transgenic (3xTg-AD) mice at 12 months, an age at which hyperphosphorylated tau is already detected and associated with cognitive decline. In these mice, we showed that tau was hyperphosphorylated on both Ser396 and Thr205 in the hippocampus, and to a lower extent and exclusively on Thr205 in the frontal cortex. Tau O-GlcNAcylation, assessed in tau immunoprecipitates, was substantially reduced in the hippocampus of 3xTg-AD mice, with no changes in the frontal cortex or in the cerebellum. No changes in the expression of the three major enzymes involved in O-GlcNAcylation, i.e., glutamine fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase, O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine transferase, and O-GlcNAc hydrolase were found in the hippocampus of 3xTg-AD mice. These data demonstrate that an imbalance between tau phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation exists in AD mice, and strengthens the hypothesis that O-GlcNAcylation might be targeted by disease modifying drugs in AD.
O-GlcNAc proteins:
TAU
Species: Mus musculus
Download
Morris M, Knudsen GM, Maeda S, Trinidad JC, Ioanoviciu A, Burlingame AL, Mucke L. Tau post-translational modifications in wild-type and human amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice. Nature neuroscience 2015 18(8) 26192747
Abstract:
The microtubule-associated protein tau has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. Reducing tau levels ameliorates AD-related synaptic, network, and behavioral abnormalities in transgenic mice expressing human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP). We used mass spectrometry to characterize the post-translational modification of endogenous tau isolated from wild-type and hAPP mice. We identified seven types of tau modifications at 63 sites in wild-type mice. Wild-type and hAPP mice had similar modifications, supporting the hypothesis that neuronal dysfunction in hAPP mice is enabled by physiological forms of tau. Our findings provide clear evidence for acetylation and ubiquitination of the same lysine residues; some sites were also targeted by lysine methylation. Our findings refute the hypothesis of extensive O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification of endogenous tau. The complex post-translational modification of physiological tau suggests that tau is regulated by diverse mechanisms.
Species: Mus musculus
Download
Graham DL, Gray AJ, Joyce JA, Yu D, O'Moore J, Carlson GA, Shearman MS, Dellovade TL, Hering H. Increased O-GlcNAcylation reduces pathological tau without affecting its normal phosphorylation in a mouse model of tauopathy. Neuropharmacology 2014 79 24326295
Abstract:
Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), mainly consisting of fibrillar aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau, are a defining pathological feature of Alzheimer's Disease and other tauopathies. Progressive accumulation of tau into NFT is considered to be a toxic cellular event causing neurodegeneration. Tau is subject to O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification and O-GlcNAcylation of tau has been suggested to regulate tau phosphorylation. We tested if an increase in tau O-GlcNAcylation affected tau phosphorylation and aggregation in the rTg4510 tau transgenic mouse model. Acute treatment of rTg4510 mice with an O-GlcNAcase inhibitor transiently reduced tau phosphorylation at epitopes implicated in tau pathology. More importantly, long-term inhibitor treatment strongly increased tau O-GlcNAcylation, reduced the number of dystrophic neurons, and protected against the formation of pathological tau species without altering the phosphorylation of non-pathological tau. This indicates that O-GlcNAcylation prevents the aggregation of tau in a manner that does not affect its normal phosphorylation state. Collectively, our results support O-GlcNAcase inhibition as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of Alzheimer's Disease and other tauopathies.
O-GlcNAc proteins:
TAU
Species: Mus musculus
Download
Kang MJ, Kim C, Jeong H, Cho BK, Ryou AL, Hwang D, Mook-Jung I, Yi EC. Synapsin-1 and tau reciprocal O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation sites in mouse brain synaptosomes. Experimental & molecular medicine 2013 45 23807304
Abstract:
O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) represents a key regulatory post-translational modification (PTM) that is reversible and often reciprocal with phosphorylation of serine and threonine at the same or nearby residues. Although recent technical advances in O-GlcNAc site-mapping methods combined with mass spectrometry (MS) techniques have facilitated study of the fundamental roles of O-GlcNAcylation in cellular processes, an efficient technique for examining the dynamic, reciprocal relationships between O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation is needed to provide greater insights into the regulatory functions of O-GlcNAcylation. Here, we describe a strategy for selectively identifying both O-GlcNAc- and phospho-modified sites. This strategy involves metal affinity separation of O-GlcNAcylated and phosphorylated peptides, β-elimination of O-GlcNAcyl or phosphoryl functional groups from the separated peptides followed by dithiothreitol (DTT) conjugation (BEMAD), affinity purification of DTT-conjugated peptides using thiol affinity chromatography, and identification of formerly O-GlcNAcylated or phosphorylated peptides by MS. The combined metal affinity separation and BEMAD approach allows selective enrichment of O-GlcNAcylated peptides over phosphorylated counterparts. Using this approach with mouse brain synaptosomes, we identified the serine residue at 605 of the synapsin-1 peptide, 603QASQAGPGPR612, and the serine residue at 692 of the tau peptide, 688SPVVSGDTSPR698, which were found to be potential reciprocal O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation sites. These results demonstrate that our strategy enables mapping of the reciprocal site occupancy of O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation of proteins, which permits the assessment of cross-talk between these two PTMs and their regulatory roles.
O-GlcNAc proteins:
TAU
Species: Mus musculus
Download
Li X, Lu F, Wang JZ, Gong CX. Concurrent alterations of O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation of tau in mouse brains during fasting. The European journal of neuroscience 2006 23(8) 16630055
Abstract:
Impaired brain glucose uptake/metabolism precedes the symptoms of Alzheimer disease (AD) and is likely to play a role in the development of the disease, but the mechanism by which it contributes to AD is not understood. Because glucose uptake/metabolism regulates protein O-GlcNAcylation, and the latter modulates phosphorylation of tau inversely, we investigated, in fasting Kunming mice, whether impaired brain glucose uptake/metabolism causes abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau and, consequently, facilitates the neurofibrillary degeneration of AD via down-regulation of tau O-GlcNAcylation. We found that fasting caused decreased tau O-GlcNAcylation and concurrent hyperphosphorylation of tau at most of the phosphorylation sites studied. The hippocampus was found more vulnerable to the tau alterations than the cerebral cortex, which is consistent with the fact that it is the hippocampus that is first affected in AD. Furthermore, hyperphosphorylation of tau induced by fasting was reversible in the brain after re-feeding. These findings provide a novel mechanism explaining how impaired brain glucose uptake/metabolism contributes to AD and suggest that it may be feasible to treat AD by reversing the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau at early stages of the disease.
O-GlcNAc proteins:
TAU
Species: Mus musculus
Download
Page 1 of 1