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Xu S, Sun F, Wu R. A Chemoenzymatic Method Based on Easily Accessible Enzymes for Profiling Protein O-GlcNAcylation. Analytical chemistry 2020 92(14) 32574038
Abstract:
O-GlcNAcylation has gradually been recognized as a critically important protein post-translational modification in mammalian cells. Besides regulation of gene expression, its crosstalk with protein phosphorylation is vital for cell signaling. Despite its importance, comprehensive analysis of O-GlcNAcylation is extraordinarily challenging due to the low abundances of many O-GlcNAcylated proteins and the complexity of biological samples. Here, we developed a novel chemoenzymatic method based on a wild-type galactosyltransferase and uridine diphosphate galactose (UDP-Gal) for global and site-specific analysis of protein O-GlcNAcylation. This method integrates enzymatic reactions and hydrazide chemistry to enrich O-GlcNAcylated peptides. All reagents used are more easily accessible and cost-effective as compared to the engineered enzyme and click chemistry reagents. Biological triplicate experiments were performed to validate the effectiveness and the reproducibility of this method, and the results are comparable with the previous chemoenzymatic method using the engineered enzyme and click chemistry. Moreover, because of the promiscuity of the galactosyltransferase, 18 unique O-glucosylated peptides were identified on the EGF domain from nine proteins. Considering that effective and approachable methods are critical to advance glycoscience research, the current method without any sample restrictions can be widely applied for global analysis of protein O-GlcNAcylation in different samples.
O-GlcNAc proteins:
SBNO1, CNOT1, SWAHB, P121C, PDLI1, TAF4, RNT2, PODXL, KMT2D, MYPT1, ZN609, SC16A, SET1A, ZN185, TNC18, PRPF3, TPD54, SYNJ1, PLIN3, MAFK, BRD4, N4BP1, ICOSL, ANR17, ZN217, NCOR1, ATRN, TOX4, ERLN2, AGFG2, VAPB, SC24A, SC24B, CNOT4, BAG3, LMNA, GCR, HSPB1, IF2A, K1C18, K2C8, K1C19, ROA1, TACD2, ATX1L, LYAG, PPAL, TPR, K1C13, ZEP1, SDC1, ATF1, CBL, GATA3, ARNT, MAP4, CLIP1, HXC9, NU214, MP2K2, CUX1, PBX2, MLH1, STAT3, LAP2A, KI67, RFX5, SOX2, NU153, RBP2, TAF6, HCFC1, AFF3, AGFG1, ATX1, AF17, DSRAD, FOXA1, NU107, FOXK1, SPTB2, TFAP4, EWS, SP2, KMT2A, IF4G1, NOTC2, TLE3, TLE4, REL, ACK1, LG3BP, AHNK, ARHG5, FOXO1, BPTF, RIPK1, NFYC, CDK13, UBP2L, LAGE3, MDC1, EPN4, RRP1B, NCOA6, GSE1, MEF2D, NUMA1, R3HD1, JHD2C, TRIP6, ELF2, TAB1, ZFHX3, ZYX, ADRM1, TAF9, RFX7, QSER1, QRIC1, TB10B, CRTC2, PRC2B, ZN362, UBAP2, RPRD2, ZN318, TASO2, ARID2, ANR40, BICRL, ABLM2, GRHL2, NIPBL, LIN54, TET2, NFRKB, KCD18, MDEAS, ZC3HE, FIP1, SAS6, MCAF1, BCOR, HAKAI, SPT6H, KDM3B, POGZ, MAVS, EMSY, RAI1, SRGP1, SH3R1, YTHD3, CASZ1, P66A, I2BP1, RB6I2, FOXP4, NAV2, GID4, MGAP, CDAN1, SUGP1, MILK2, NUP93, ZN687, FNBP4, ARFG1, ENAH, PHC3, SP20H, KMT2C, STT3B, DLG5, WIPF2, ZFN2B, LMO7, ATX2L, CSKI2, P66B, SMG7, CBP, SEM4D, FUBP2, LPP, PF21A, INT12, CERS2, GWL, PDLI5, CHAP1, ANCHR, Z512B, ZFR, EP400, RBM14, CIC, MINT, S29A1, DPH2, WAC, DIDO1, HNRL1, YTHD1, CEP44, SP130, I2BPL, FOXP1, WNK1, E41L1, ZHX3, GORS2, PKHA5, RC3H2, TAF9B, NCOA5, TANC2, CELR2, UBN1, PDLI7, RBM12, CARF, TAB2, CNOT2, KANL3, STAP2, TCF20, UBQL2, S30BP, SIX4, TASOR, GMEB2, ZHX1, YETS2, PKCB1, NOTC3, TRI33, SRRM2, CHM2B, SCML2, POLH, R3HD2, ZN281, WNK2, PRC2C, NCOR2, GMEB1, ZHX2
Species: Homo sapiens
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Li J, Li Z, Duan X, Qin K, Dang L, Sun S, Cai L, Hsieh-Wilson LC, Wu L, Yi W. An Isotope-Coded Photocleavable Probe for Quantitative Profiling of Protein O-GlcNAcylation. ACS chemical biology 2019 14(1) 30620550
Abstract:
O-linked N-acetylglucosamine ( O-GlcNAc) is a ubiquitous post-translational modification of proteins and is essential for cell function. Quantifying the dynamics of O-GlcNAcylation in a proteome-wide level is critical for uncovering cellular mechanisms and functional roles of O-GlcNAcylation in cells. Here, we develop an isotope-coded photocleavable probe for profiling protein O-GlcNAcylation dynamics using quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. This probe enables selective tagging and isotopic labeling of O-GlcNAcylated proteins in one step from complex cellular mixtures. We demonstrate the application of the probe to quantitatively profile O-GlcNAcylation sites in 293T cells upon chemical induction of O-GlcNAc levels. We further applied the probe to quantitatively analyze the stoichiometry of O-GlcNAcylation between sorafenib-sensitive and sorafenib-resistant liver cancer cells, which lays the foundation for mechanistic investigation of O-GlcNAcylation in regulating cancer chemoresistance. Thus, this probe provides a powerful tool to profile O-GlcNAcylation dynamics in cells.
O-GlcNAc proteins:
A0A0B4J203, A0A0C4DFX4, SBNO1, P121B, CX028, RGPD3, AN36A, P121C, GG6L6, S31C2, E9PCH4, H0YAE9, H0YHG0, GG6LV, H3BMH7, PDLI1, TAF4, BCL9, ABLM1, CHD2, KMT2D, RGPD8, OPLA, HGS, MYPT1, ZN609, SC16A, SET1A, TIF1A, EIF3H, TET3, M3K7, PRPF3, TPD54, IF4G3, E41L2, AKAP8, TM11D, MYPT2, GANP, PLIN3, MAFK, BRD4, MITF, N4BP1, ATG13, PP6R2, ANR17, NCOR1, SPAG7, SRS10, SF3B1, CSDE1, TOX4, PCF11, AGFG2, SMC2, M3K6, SC24B, ZBT11, CNOT4, EYA4, OXSR1, ZMYM6, CCNE2, ANGT, LMNA, ALDOA, GCR, HSPB1, F13B, RLA2, K1C18, K2C8, ZFY, SRPRA, RU17, VIME, RU2A, ATX1L, RGPD1, S31C1, GLI3, LYAG, PABP1, COBA1, CO6A3, MYH7, ENPL, ZEP1, RS2, ZFX, ZNF30, ANPRC, ATF7, EGR1, SON, RCC1, ATF1, ATF6A, HXA5, ROA2, CBL, IF4B, GATA2, RIR1, RAE1, APC, ATPA, ARNT, MAP4, HXD9, HLAF, CLIP1, ZEP2, MYH10, TIE1, NU214, DEK, PDE6B, SRP14, CUX1, LPPRC, GATA4, KI67, YAP1, RFX5, SOX2, PRC2A, NASP, CDK8, NU153, RBP2, TAF6, EMD, PAPOA, HCFC1, NEK4, AGFG1, NUP98, INHBC, CADH6, F193A, RT36, RT34, SARNP, LACTB, COG7, FOXK1, DAB2, PLIN5, SPTB2, SP2, NRG1, IF4G1, K1C17, TLE1, TLE3, TLE4, UBE3A, ACK1, AHNK, FCHO2, FOXO1, TROAP, BPTF, IRAG2, BFSP1, FOXC1, PRDM2, DDX10, G3BP1, PABP4, GRB10, PPIG, MADCA, PICAL, MAMD1, CUL4B, ASPP2, SPTN1, CDK13, CYLC2, DSG2, UBP2L, SRC8, ITPR3, PUM1, MDC1, EPN4, RRP1B, NCOA6, RRP5, RFTN1, R3HD1, WDR43, EEA1, MTFR1, SF3B3, RYR3, SF01, JHD2C, ELF2, MYLK, TAB1, ZYX, ADRM1, QSER1, CL16A, RHG31, AAK1, TMM44, AMOT, IF44L, YIF1B, AG10A, CD048, FSIP2, ESCO1, S2553, BCORL, AN36C, MTUS2, PRC2B, CEP78, SAMD9, TSBP1, LRIF1, CXG2, SKT, ZN648, UBAP2, RBM26, RC3H1, EFCB6, CE350, RPRD2, S31A6, TASO2, ECM29, RN123, PLCX3, ARID2, DEN2C, K0930, LIN54, M18BP, SCYL2, NFRKB, KLH35, ZC3HE, ANR11, FIP1, SBSN, S49A3, FAT4, MCAF1, BCOR, DUSTY, GGYF2, BNC2, CO039, SRCAP, UBN2, FOXNB, UBP54, HAKAI, ASXL2, KNDC1, SPT6H, TAOK1, KDM3B, RGPD4, POGZ, NUFP2, EMSY, I2BP2, SH3R1, HUWE1, YTHD3, FLIP1, KAISO, MYPN, TTC6, LDB1, TM135, TBC26, ZFHX4, ANGL5, SPAS2, DZIP1, P66A, AHNK2, FMNL3, NAV2, ARI3B, MGAP, RP1L1, CC28A, Z3H7A, CDAN1, ANKH1, SUGP1, PHAR4, KMT2E, XRN1, SPART, NUP93, ZN687, CMTR1, THMS1, AN36B, TMTC2, SYNPO, FNBP4, GG6L1, ENAH, GG6L2, SLAI1, PHC3, BD1L1, NUP35, DDX55, NEIL3, GSDMB, ALMS1, STK35, GEMI5, RPGF6, SMCR8, WIPF2, TM171, RN133, TEKT4, LMO7, CKAP2, ATX2L, ACO11, P66B, DAAF4, BBX, FIG4, ZN516, RREB1, FUBP2, LPP, E2F7, TTC28, TOM6, ASTRA, OTUB2, PGBD4, LEG12, ELP4, RBM33, MYEOV, SMRD1, DDX27, P121A, TONSL, PDLI5, THOC3, VCIP1, LRIQ1, ZFR, EP400, CBPC4, RBM14, IPP2L, QKI, PLIN4, JMJD8, RBM15, MINT, SEC62, AGAP2, RGPD5, ATX2, MYD88, ARI3A, SPI2A, SPI2B, DPH2, MCMBP, TMPSD, YTHD1, WNK3, PP12C, TB182, TANC1, CEP44, SENP6, BRD8, RGAP1, ALX4, KI13A, KCNH6, ZN106, FOXP1, PABP3, SMOC2, WNK1, ZHX3, CP095, REEP4, DOCK5, ZN703, GORS2, MLXIP, PKHA5, FOH1B, RC3H2, TANC2, TRPM3, SYTL2, CP4FC, GAK5, JPH1, APMAP, DMAP1, GP108, KMT5A, GPR84, DUOX2, DUOX1, PCDBG, MDN1, NALP2, CARF, HXC10, TAB2, CDK12, ADA2, ITSN2, F135A, SI1L2, RBM27, KANL3, ZN219, DYH17, AFF4, NB5R1, S30BP, NRBP, BAZ2A, SIX4, HOOK1, TASOR, GMEB2, ZHX1, TAOK2, CFA92, MRTFB, ZBT21, PRR12, YETS2, HECD1, MYO6, ICAM5, MAGD2, SCAF8, TRAK1, SHAN2, SRRM2, EXO1, SCML2, POK19, POLH, NCKP1, AT11B, NOP58, ZN281, UB2J1, GRIP1, SALL2, ARIP4, RPGF2, HYOU1, TTLL3, PRC2C, PCDB4, NCOR2, CP46A, BZW2, CABIN, NCOA3, S23IP, U3KPZ7
Species: Homo sapiens
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Sharma NS, Gupta VK, Dauer P, Kesh K, Hadad R, Giri B, Chandra A, Dudeja V, Slawson C, Banerjee S, Vickers SM, Saluja A, Banerjee S. O-GlcNAc modification of Sox2 regulates self-renewal in pancreatic cancer by promoting its stability. Theranostics 2019 9(12) 31281487
Abstract:
Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) claims more than 90% of the patients diagnosed with the disease owing to its aggressive biology that is manifested by high rate of tumor recurrence. Aberrant upregulation in the transcriptional activity of proteins involved in self-renewal like Sox2, Oct4 and Nanog is instrumental in these recurrence phenomena. In cancer, Sox2 is aberrantly "turned-on" leading to activation of downstream genes those results in relapse of the tumor. Molecular mechanisms that regulate the activity of Sox2 in PDAC are not known. In the current study, we have studied the how glycosylation of Sox2 by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) can affect its transcriptional activity and thus regulate self-renewal in cancer. Methods: RNA-Seq analysis of CRISPR-OGTi PDAC cells indicated a deregulation of differentiation and self-renewal pathways in PDAC. Pancreatic tumor burden following inhibition of OGT in vivo was done by using small molecule inhibitor, OSMI, on subcutaneous implantation of PDAC cells. Sox2 activity assay was performed by Dual Luciferase Reporter Assay kit. Results: Our study shows for the first time that in PDAC, glycosylation of Sox2 by OGT stabilizes it in the nucleus. Site directed mutagenesis of this site (S246A) prevents this modification. We further show that inhibition of OGT delayed initiation of pancreatic tumors by inhibition of Sox2. We also show that targeting OGT in vivo with a small molecule-inhibitor OSMI, results in decreased tumor burden in PDAC. Conclusion: Understanding this mechanism of SOX2 regulation by its glycosylation is expected to pave the way for development of novel therapy that has the potential to eradicate the cells responsible for tumor-recurrence.
O-GlcNAc proteins:
SOX2
Species: Homo sapiens
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Hahne H, Gholami AM, Kuster B. Discovery of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins in published large-scale proteome data. Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP 2012 11(10) 22661428
Abstract:
The attachment of N-acetylglucosamine to serine or threonine residues (O-GlcNAc) is a post-translational modification on nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins with emerging roles in numerous cellular processes, such as signal transduction, transcription, and translation. It is further presumed that O-GlcNAc can exhibit a site-specific, dynamic and possibly functional interplay with phosphorylation. O-GlcNAc proteins are commonly identified by tandem mass spectrometry following some form of biochemical enrichment. In the present study, we assessed if, and to which extent, O-GlcNAc-modified proteins can be discovered from existing large-scale proteome data sets. To this end, we conceived a straightforward O-GlcNAc identification strategy based on our recently developed Oscore software that automatically analyzes tandem mass spectra for the presence and intensity of O-GlcNAc diagnostic fragment ions. Using the Oscore, we discovered hundreds of O-GlcNAc peptides not initially identified in these studies, and most of which have not been described before. Merely re-searching this data extended the number of known O-GlcNAc proteins by almost 100 suggesting that this modification exists even more widely than previously anticipated and the modification is often sufficiently abundant to be detected without enrichment. However, a comparison of O-GlcNAc and phospho-identifications from the very same data indicates that the O-GlcNAc modification is considerably less abundant than phosphorylation. The discovery of numerous doubly modified peptides (i.e. peptides with one or multiple O-GlcNAc or phosphate moieties), suggests that O-GlcNAc and phosphorylation are not necessarily mutually exclusive, but can occur simultaneously at adjacent sites.
Species: Homo sapiens
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